The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Activism

Edited by Rebecca Ruth Gould and Kayvan Tahmasebian

Table of Contents (updated July 2018)

Rebecca Ruth Gould and Kayvan Tahmasebian, “Introducing Translation and Activism”

I. Theorizing Translation and Activism

1. Gianmarco Fifi (University of Warwick)
“Translation As Praxis: From the Prevalence of the Economic Structure to Gramsci’s Return to Marx”

2. Marta Natalia Wróblewska (University of Warwick)
“Gramsci in Polish Translation”

3 Morad Farhadpour (Iranian philosopher)
“Thought/Translation”

II. The Translator as Activist

4. Kobus Marais (University of the Free State, South Africa)
“The Linguist’s Staff: Exploring The Multimodality of Translation In Precolonial African Contexts”

5. Jassi Sandhar (University of Bristol)
“It actually takes three to tango: On the translator as the unacknowledged activist”

6. Wangui wa Goro (University of London)
“Beyond intersectional lines: Translating Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o

7. Moses Kilolo (Managing editor of Jalada)
“The Single Most Translated Short Story in the History of African Writing”

III. Bearing Witness

8. Yousif Qasmiyeh (Oxford University)
“Host writing: translating the origin(s) and the fragmentary in poetry”

9. Amanda Hopkinson (City University of London) & Hazel Marsh (University of East Anglia)
“Narrative Voices in Latin America”

10. Brahim El Guabli (Williams College)
“Co-writing and Prefatory Practices in Moroccan Testimonial Literature as Translation”

IV. Translation and Legal Change

11. Noelle Higgins (Maynooth University)
“The Right not to have an Interpreter in Criminal Trials: A Case Study of Ireland”

12. Miriam Bak McKenna (Lund University)
“Feminism in Translation: The Discourse of Human Rights and International Law”

13. Gargi Katikithala (Jindal Global Law School)
“Deconstructing the Language of Trauma to Achieve Access to Justice”

14. Sahar Fathi (University of Washington)
“The Right to Understand – A Look into the Local Response for Better Interpretation in the US”

V. Translation and Social Transformation

15. Aditya Kumar Panda (Central Institute of Indian Languages)
“Translation, Power, Resistance in Medieval India”

16. Trudy Mercadal (Freelance writer and translator)
“Interpretation, Mayan Languages, and Social Change in Post War Guatemala”

17. Keith Vincent (Boston University)
“AIDS and Queer Theory in 1990s Japan”

VI. Translation, Migration, Refugees

18. Aria Fani (UC Berkeley)
“What Is Asylum? Translating Trauma, Memory, and Legal Jargon”

19. Veruska Cantelli (Champlain College) & Bhakti Shringarpure (University of Connecticut)
“Resistant Recipes: Translating Gender, Culture and Food Activism in Refugee Narratives”

20. Elena Fiddian-Qasmieh (UCL) & Yousif Qasmiyeh (Oxford University)
“Citation and recitation: translating the veiling practices of Sahrawan refugees”

21. Mahsa Farhaanjam (University of Tehran) & Farhad Abedini Saadabad (University of Allameh Tabatabaei)
“Emigrants’ Right to Using Mother Tongue in Foreign Courts and International Institutions”

VII. Translation and Revolution

22. Kuan-yen Liu (The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
“Cultural Translation/Appropriation of Darwinism in Chinese Revolutionary Manifestos”

23. Omid Mehrgan (Johns Hopkins University)
“Revolting Words, Reactionary Paragraphs: Translation’s Sensitive Politics in Post-Revolutionary Iran”

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